Prince Edward Island Videos

Prince Edward Island Travel Guide: 401 reviews and 917 photos

  • planxty's video
    Coming back home again planxty, Elmira Date Added: Mar 20, 2015

    This is the speeder train at the excellent Elmira Railway Museum returning the last stretch back to the start point after a wonderful ride.

  • planxty's video

    This is the beginning of the outbound journey on the "speeder" train at the wonderful Elmira Railway Museum. Basically a speeder was a small deisel powered wagon used for transporting workers to maintain the track. It was great fun.

  • planxty's video

    The wonderfully friendly and charming Josh treated me to a demonstration of oyster "shucking" which I would havbe paid a pretty penny for in a London restaurant and all for the price of the beer I was drinking!

  • planxty's video

    The first part of our trip over the remarkable Confederation Bridge between PEI and New Brunswick. At about eight miles long, it si mightily impressive.

  • planxty's video
    Arriving on PEI planxty, Prince Edward Island Date Added: Dec 27, 2014

    This is the ferry from Nova Scotia arriving at Woods Harbour on PEI.

  • miTravel's video

    As a visitor to PEI, you can do more than just witness the Island way of life. You can live it, too.

  • miTravel's video

    Harness racing has a rich history in Prince Edward Island - Farmers raced their horses back before Confederation in 1867. It has evolved into an important sport in the Maritimes with one of the country's most significant races taking place in Charlottetown every summer....the Gold Cup and Saucer Race. It attracts some of the top horses and drivers from across North America in pursuit of this prestigious trophy
    Imagine what it must be like to own one of these magnificent horses and know the thrill of watching your horse moving up along the rail on its way to the finish line. Well, imagine no more. Head to the Red Shores Charlottetown Driving Park and be an Owner for an Evening.

  • miTravel's video

    The first mode of transportation for early settlers was the sea. Lighthouses were as important to them in their trade and commerce, particularly in shipbuilding, as the railway was after Confederation. Many colonial or "first-generation" lighthouses – those built before 1873 – are octagonal shaped, and were constructed when timber was abundant in this province.

    The "second- generation" lighthouses, those built after 1873, are square tapered. Some of the largest timber had to be imported from New Brunswick as the Island timber supply had been depleted by the shipbuilding industry. Each lighthouse had its individual day markings and distinguishing flash patterns.

    West Point Lighthouse, constructed in 1875, was the first of the second generation lighthouses on Prince Edward Island.

  • miTravel's video

    Prince Edward Island is the perfect province to cycle. The Confederation Trail runs tip-to-tip from Tignish to Elmira and includes 400 kilometers of excellent rolled stone dust surface for cycling.
    The trail was developed on abandoned railway lines and takes you into wetlands and hardwood groves, through quaint villages and along sparkling rivers.
    No matter what your game -- quiet rides in the country that provide frame after frame of breathtaking photographs, day-long tours that test skill and endurance, or bone-shaking terrain that will challenge both bike and rider, PEI is the destination of choice for die-hard and casual cyclists alike.
    For touring enthusiasts, just get on your bike and start pedalling. The rolling hills, lush farmlands and postcard coastlines that keep our visitors coming back for more will reveal to you a whole new appreciation for your two-wheeling hobby.
    Frequent villages along the way offer cyclists a convenient selection of places to stay, things to eat and all round service.

  • Jefie's video

    Just a short clip I shot while I was out camping with my family in PEI - sorry, the narration is all in French!

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