"Charwoman Ann, taking a piece..." Portsmouth Things to Do Tip by pjallittle

Portsmouth Things to Do: 130 reviews and 270 photos

 
 

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Charwoman Ann, taking a piece of trash to a receptacle. Tourists doing their part to keep Portsmouth Harbour spic and span.
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HMS Victory, flagship of Vice Admiral Lord Nelson at the Battle of Trafalgar (21st October 1805) and of Admiral Sir John Jervis at the Battle of Cape St. Vincent (14th February 1797) is the most famous warship in the world.

HMS Victory is the only remaining 18th Century warship anywhere in the world and is the oldest serving Royal Navy ship in commission - she remains a fully commissioned ship with her own complement of officers and crew and is the flagship of the Second Sea Lord, Commander in Chief Naval Home Command.
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HMS Victory was ordered in 1758, the same year in which Horatio Nelson was born at Burnham Thorpe in Norfolk. The keel was laid at Chatham Dockyard in 1759 with Victory being completed six years later. Her construction took 27 miles of rigging, 4 acres of sails and required 2,000 mature trees. She cost 63,176 to build. HMS Victory saw almost constant service from 1778 to 1812.

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<b>Battle Honours - HMS Victory</b>.
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Ushant - 1781

St. Vincent - 1797

Trafalgar - 1805

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HMS Victory is maintained today as a monument to Trafalgar and to Nelson. Having survived a demolition order (she was saved from destruction in 1922 and moved to No. 2 Dock), the ravages of teredo worm and death watch beetle and a German bomb in World War II, Victory is now being restored to her Trafalgar condition in one of the most ambitious ship preservation programmes anywhere.

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The guided tour around the ship recreates life at sea in the time of Nelson. From the luxury of the Great Cabin to the cramped gun decks and grim conditions for the ordinary sailor, from the deck where Nelson was shot to the cockpit where he died. The gun decks retain the great rows of cannon, amongst which the ordinary sailors lived and died.

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No visit to Portsmouth is complete without a visit (or pilgrimage?) to HMS Victory.

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  • Written Aug 24, 2002
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