"Palazzo Nuovo, Some of Its Art" Top 5 Page for this destination Campidoglio - Capitoline Hill Tip by von.otter

Campidoglio - Capitoline Hill, Rome: 112 reviews and 202 photos

  Palazzo Nuovo, Marforio, Rome, May 2007
by von.otter
 
  • Palazzo Nuovo, Marforio, Rome, May 2007 - Rome
      Palazzo Nuovo, Marforio, Rome, May 2007
    by von.otter
  • Palazzo Nuovo, a Satyr, Rome, May 2007 - Rome
      Palazzo Nuovo, a Satyr, Rome, May 2007
    by von.otter
  • Palazzo Nuovo, Rome, May 2007 - Rome
      Palazzo Nuovo, Rome, May 2007
    by von.otter
  • - Rome
  • Palazzo Nuovo, Capitoline Venus, Rome, May 2007 - Rome
      Palazzo Nuovo, Capitoline Venus, Rome, May 2007
    by von.otter
 

Palazzo Nuovo, meaning “new palace,” is the smaller of the two museums on the Capitoline Hill. It is a spectacular museum, including many objects from antiquity. One of the most stunning antiques is the large lounging sculpture of a water god, called Marforio by the Romans, found just inside the main entry way. Being a water god, it is appropriate the Marforio is the centerpiece of a fountain (see photo #1).

Palazzo Nuovo was built in the 17th century under the direction of Girolamo Rainaldi and his son Carlo. From the outside, Palazzo Nuovo is identical to Palazzo dei Conservatori, across Piazza dei Campidoglio. Palazzo Nuovo and Palazzo dei Conservatori comprise the Musei Capitolini Museums, which were established in 1471 by Pope Sixtus I. The Holy Father donated a series of bronze statues to the city of Rome.

On exhibit here are mostly sculptures from Ancient Greece and Rome. A satyr (see photo #2); a lion and Minerva, goddess of Wisdom (see photo #3); as well as numerous plaques with Roman text (see photo #4) are examples of what you will see.

The one of the most well-known works from Antiquity is the Capitoline Venus (see photo #5). She is Venus Pudica, a modest Venus. Posed with her right hand moving to cover her breasts and her left placed over her groin, she emerges from her bath. This is an original, dating from the second or third centuries BC; many copies followed.

Venus was found on the Viminal Hill in the Stazi family gardens; Clement X (born 1590, pope from 1670 to 1676) was pope. Bought by Pope Benedict XIV from the Stazi in 1752, the Holy Father gave it to the Capitoline Museums. Venus is displayed in her own Classically-designed niche — called the Cabinet of Venus — on the ground floor.

Venus was loaned to the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. from June 8 to September 18, 2011, being shown in the rotunda of the West Building.

Entry into the museum was once directly from Piazza dei Campidoglio but no longer. Tickets must be bought at the Palazzo dei Conservatori; and an underground passage leads to Palazzo Nuovo. The museum is open Tuesday through Sunday from 09:00 to 20:00.

Review Helpfulness: 4.5 out of 5 stars

Was this review helpful?

  • Updated Sep 18, 2012
  • Send to a Friend
  • Report Abuse

Comments

von.otter

“Enjoy the Journey”

Online Now

Male

Top 1,000 Travel Writer
Member Rank:
0 0 3 1 0
Forum Rank:
0 0 1 5 1

Have you been to Rome?

  Share Your Travels