"13) Hall of Imperial Peace (Imperial Garden)" Forbidden City - The Palace Museum Tip by cal6060

  One Heavenly Gate, Forbidden City
by cal6060
 
  • One Heavenly Gate, Forbidden City - Beijing
      One Heavenly Gate, Forbidden City
    by cal6060
  • Hall of Imperial Peace, Forbidden City - Beijing
      Hall of Imperial Peace, Forbidden City
    by cal6060
  • Hall of Imperial Peace, Forbidden City - Beijing
      Hall of Imperial Peace, Forbidden City
    by cal6060
  • Hill of Accumulated Elegance, Forbidden City - Beijing
      Hill of Accumulated Elegance, Forbidden City
    by cal6060
  • Pavilion to User in Light, Forbidden City - Beijing
      Pavilion to User in Light, Forbidden City
    by cal6060
 

In the center of Imperial Garden, there were stone garden before you enter the One Heavenly Gate to Hall of the Imperial Peace. On the east side of the Imperial Peach is the Hill of Accumulated Elegance, and facing Pavilion to User in Light.

1) Hall of Imperial Peace (钦安殿, Qin An Dian) / One Heavenly Gate (天一门, Tian Yi Men)

" Located on the central axis of the Forbidden City, this hall is a major building in the Imperial Garden. It was first constructed in 1535 during the Ming Dynasty and is encircled by a wall. This hall is five bays wide and three bays deep. Its roof is covered with yellow glazed tiles and is decorated with carved overhanging eaves and a gold-plated knob in the middle. In the center of the courtyard wall there is a gate named Tian Yi Men (One Heavenly Gate). Inside the gate is a cypress with entwined branches. The glazed pavilion in the east of the courtyard was where silk was burnt during sacrificial rites.
In the Ming and Qing dynasties, the hall enshrined the state of Water God Zhenwu, one of the Taoist deities. During the Qing Dynasty, every New Year an altar would set up within Tian Yi Men (One Heavenly Gate) for the emperor to burn incense and pay homage to the gods. During festivals, Taoist rituals were performed in this hall. " (Note from Signboard).

2) Hill of Accumulated Elegance (堆秀山, Dui Xiu Shan)

" This artificial hill was made of rocks piled on the original site of Guan Hua Dian (Hall of Appreciating Flowers), against the northern palace wall. Originally, it was named Dui Xiu Shan (Hill of Accumulated Embroidery), and in the Qianlong reign period, it was given its present name.
The hill is about 10 meters high. On the top stands Yu Jing Ting (Pavilion of Imperial Scenery), which is reached by a path. At the Double Ninth Festival every year, the emperor, empresses and imperial concubines climbed the hill along the path. Halfway up the hill, there is
a brick cave running from east to west. A cave at the foot of the hill has an arched roof, with a stone caisson carved in the shape of a dragon. Over the entrance hangs a horizontal board inscribed with two words "Dui Xiu" (Accumulated Elegance). Halfway up the hill there are bronze jars to store water. When water runs from the hill, it spurts out of the dragonheads on the back of lions on the left and right sides of the hill." (Note from Signboard)

3) Pavilion to User in Light

" Constructed in the Ming Dynasty, this pavilion was originally named Qing Wang Ge (Pavilion of High Expectation). The name was changed to Yan Hui Ge in the Qing Dynasty. It has rolled gable roof covered with yellow glazed tiles and stands facing Dui Xiu Shan (Hill of Accumulated Elegance). In the Qing Dynasty, it was the place where the emperor's concubines were selected. Emperor Qianlong, Daoguang and Xianfeng once composed poems and amused themselves in this pavilion. Emperor Jiaqing preserved over 10,000 calligraphic works written by emperor in this pavilion. " (Note from Signboard)

NEXT: Palace of Gathered Elegance (Chuxiu Palace)

Address: North of Tiananmen Square
Directions: In Center of Imperial Garden, Forbidden City.
Phone: 010-85007422, 85007421
Website: http://www.dpm.org.cn/

Review Helpfulness: 3.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Updated Aug 2, 2012
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