"Sadly no more." St Nicholas Cole Abbey-The Wren Cafe Tip by planxty

  St. Nicholas Cole Abbey, London, UK.
by planxty
 
  • St. Nicholas Cole Abbey, London, UK. - London
      St. Nicholas Cole Abbey, London, UK.
    by planxty
  • St. Nicholas Cole Abbey, London, UK. - London
      St. Nicholas Cole Abbey, London, UK.
    by planxty
  • St. Nicholas Cole Abbey, London, UK. - London
      St. Nicholas Cole Abbey, London, UK.
    by planxty
  • St. Nicholas Cole Abbey, London, UK. - London
      St. Nicholas Cole Abbey, London, UK.
    by planxty
  • St. Nicholas Cole Abbey, London, UK. - London
      St. Nicholas Cole Abbey, London, UK.
    by planxty
 

I have to say that Christian churches in the City of london, depite the best efforts of the Great Fire of London and the German Luftwaffe amongst other things, seem to fare fairly well and many are still fully functioning places of worship. As I have said in many other tips on VT, I am not a religious man, I am an atheist, although I have a great interest in churches, synagogues, temples, mosques, gurdwaras etc. etc., as I believe they are a great source of social history as well as places of great peace and often architectural significance. It therefore saddens me when I see a Church no longer open as is unfortunately the case with St. Nicholas Cole "Abbey" in Great Victoria Street right in the heart of the City of London and literally in the shadow of St. Pauls.

Although not open, I did rather enjoy looking at it as an architectural work, took some photos for VT and then decided to research it a little.

The church is first recorded in the 12th century but, like so much of the City, it was extensively damaged in the Great Fire of 1666. In fact, it was the first of the 51 churches destroyed to be rebuilt after the fire.

Despite several downturns in worshippers, by the late 19th century it was the best attended church in the City, attracting more then 450 worshippers.

However, as alluded to before, they place could not withstand the depradations of the Luftwaffe and the building was dammaged in 1941, not being rebuilt fully and reconsecrated until 1962.

I find it a little sad that, having survived as long as it has and survived so much, it is no longer open. Worth looking at on the way past.

Address: Great Victoria Street.
Directions: Head towards the river from the back of St. Pauls, past the Mustard bar, and it is on the right.
Phone: +00 44 (0)1865 284885
Website: http://www.culham.ac.uk/

Review Helpfulness: 3.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Updated Aug 21, 2014
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