"The Loggia dei Lanzi on the Piazza della Signoria" Loggia Dei Lanzi Tip by JoostvandenVondel

Loggia Dei Lanzi, Florence: 37 reviews and 93 photos

  Cellini's Perseus in the Loggia dei Lanzi
by JoostvandenVondel
 
  • Cellini's Perseus in the Loggia dei Lanzi - Florence
      Cellini's Perseus in the Loggia dei Lanzi
    by JoostvandenVondel
  • Cellini's Perseus, Detail - Florence
      Cellini's Perseus, Detail
    by JoostvandenVondel
  • Giambologna's Rape of the Sabine Women - Florence
      Giambologna's Rape of the Sabine Women
    by JoostvandenVondel
  • Giambologna's Rape of the Sabine Women, Detail - Florence
      Giambologna's Rape of the Sabine Women, Detail
    by JoostvandenVondel
  • Giambologna's Rape of the Sabine Women, Shadow - Florence
      Giambologna's Rape of the Sabine Women, Shadow
    by JoostvandenVondel
 

This open-air structure adjoining the Uffizi Gallery and opening onto the Piazza della Signoria was built between 1376 and 1382 by Benci di Cione and Simone di Francesco Talenti. The Loggia dei Lanzi or also referred to as the Loggia della Signoria, offers a delicate medieval flavour to the Piazza so dominated by heavy Renaissance structures and acts as an open-air sculpture gallery of antique and Renaissance statuary.

The visitor is especially attracted by two works. On the far left stands the bronze statue of Perseus by Benvenuto Cellini (1545-54). It portrays the mythological king of Mycenea holding the slain head of the monstrous Medusa. It could be easily mistaken as David holding the head of Goliath, however Perseus stands 18 ft tall and he holds the head of his victim high for all to see. His youthful exhuberance may also recall to the onlooker the biblical hero, but perhaps it was Cellini's penchant for the youthful masculine form which inspire his portrayal of the powerful Mycenean king.

On the far right is another remarkable statue, The Rape of the Sabine Women (1581-83) by the Flemish artist Jean de Boulogne or also known as Giambologna. Made from a single block of white marble, Giambologna created a figura serpentina, or an upward snakelike spiral movement of figures to be examined from all sides. Indeed, each side allows the viewer a different perspective, from the twisted body of the older male figure at the bottom, the muscular intensity of the central Roman captor, to the desperate resistance of the Sabine woman.

In my opinion the Loggia is a wonderful invitation to the Uffizi as it entices visitors curious to discover which treasures are housed in its galleries after delighting in the superb works displayed in their exterior surroundings.

Address: Piazza della Signoria
Phone: +39 055 23885
Website: http://www.polomuseale.firenze.it/

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  • Written Aug 1, 2009
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JoostvandenVondel

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