"Foro Romano, Part VI, Temple of Castor & Pollux" Top 5 Page for this destination Roman Forum - Temple of Castor and Pollux Tip by von.otter

  Temple of Castor + Pollux, May 2007
by von.otter
 
  • Temple of Castor + Pollux, May 2007 - Rome
      Temple of Castor + Pollux, May 2007
    by von.otter
  • Temple of Castor + Pollux, May 2007 - Rome
      Temple of Castor + Pollux, May 2007
    by von.otter
  • Temple of Castor + Pollux, May 2007 - Rome
      Temple of Castor + Pollux, May 2007
    by von.otter
  • Temple of Castor + Pollux, May 2007 - Rome
      Temple of Castor + Pollux, May 2007
    by von.otter
  • Temple of Castor + Pollux, May 2007 - Rome
      Temple of Castor + Pollux, May 2007
    by von.otter
 

?All the successive ages since Rome began to decay have done their best to ruin the very ruins by taking away the marble and the hewn stone for their own structures, and leaving only the inner filling up of brickwork, which the ancient architects never designed to be seen.?
? From the 1858 ?French and Italian Note-Books? of Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864)

On 15 July 499 BC during a battle on the shores of Lake Regillus where the Romans took the offensive against their neighboring communities, twin divine knights of extraordinary beauty and stature were seen, with their lances at rest, at the forefront of the cavalry leading it to victory.

At exactly the same moment in the Foro Romano two identical youths were seen dismounting their horses and leading them to drink at the Fountain of Juturna. Those in the Forum were drawn to the young men and asked of the battle. The youths told their questioners that the Romans had won the day, and immediately vanished. All who had seen them swore that they were the Dioscuri, Castor and Pollux, twin sons of Jupiter and Leda, and the primary stars in the Gemini constellation.

A temple was built to the twins by Albinus, the general in command of the cavalry, upon his return to Rome. Over the 1,000 years before Rome?s fall it was expanded and rebuilt many times. These 3 white marble, 41-foot high, Corinthian columns are all that remain of the magnificent temple. Within the podium of the temple there were numerous tabernae, shops, used by jewelers, money changers, and even barbers.

Website: http://www.vroma.org/~forum/tcaspol.html

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  • Updated Apr 21, 2009
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