"Castor+Pollux, Boys at the Top of The Stairs, Pt 2" Top 5 Page for this destination Capitoline Hill - Campidoglio Tip by von.otter

Capitoline Hill - Campidoglio, Rome: 86 reviews and 145 photos

  Castor+Pollux, Piazza del Campidoglio, May 2007
by von.otter
 
  • Castor+Pollux, Piazza del Campidoglio, May 2007 - Rome
      Castor+Pollux, Piazza del Campidoglio, May 2007
    by von.otter
  • Castor+Pollux, Piazza del Campidoglio, May 2007 - Rome
      Castor+Pollux, Piazza del Campidoglio, May 2007
    by von.otter
  • Castor+Pollux, Piazza del Campidoglio, May 2007 - Rome
      Castor+Pollux, Piazza del Campidoglio, May 2007
    by von.otter
  • Pollux, Piazza del Campidoglio, May 2007 - Rome
      Pollux, Piazza del Campidoglio, May 2007
    by von.otter
 

?On the steps of the Capitol itself, stand two colossal statues of Castor and Pollux, each with his horse, finely executed.?
from a letter written by Percy Shelley to a friend, T.L.P., Esq. dated 23.March.1819, Rome

BROTHER TWINS They are Castor & Pollux. Because their mother, Leda, first slept with Zeus, then with King Tyndareus of Sparta within the same night Pollux is divine, and Castor is mortal. They are inseparable, never doing anything without the other at his side.

On 15 July 499 BC, during a battle on the shores of Lake Regillus where the Romans took the offensive against their neighboring communities, these twin brothers, of extraordinary beauty and stature, dressed as divine knights were seen, with their lances at rest, at the forefront of the cavalry leading it to victory.

At exactly the same moment in the Foro Romano two identical youths were seen dismounting their horses and leading them to drink at the Fountain of Juturna. Those in the Forum were drawn to the young men and asked of the battle. The youths told their questioners that the Romans had won the day, and immediately vanished. All who had seen them swore that they were the Dioscuri, Castor and Pollux, twin sons of Jupiter and Leda, and the primary stars in the Gemini constellation.

With their mighty steeds the regal Dioscuri stand at the top of the Cordonato greeting all visitors. They are Roman copies of Greek originals dating from the late Imperial era, originally from a temple in the Circus Flaminius.

They are magnificent!

Review Helpfulness: 3.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Written Mar 9, 2008
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