"Visit the Queens Cross Church in Maryhill, Glasgow" Charles Renne MacIntosh Tip by pal25

Charles Renne MacIntosh, Glasgow: 10 reviews and 8 photos

 
 

Queen?s Cross Church in Maryhill, Glasgow, is considered to be on of Charles Rennie Mackintosh most mysterious project. This building is the only church by the Glasgow born artist to be built and is now the Charles Rennie Mackintosh Society headquarters.

The church is one of the artist?s purest works and was build between 1897 and 1899, during the same period as the early stages of the Glasgow School of Arts. The building was a project for the Free Church and Mackintosh once again gave it his own iconic twist, marrying different styles and influences together in this unique space.

The design contains gothic influences, such as the magnificent stained glass blue heart window, and pre-Reformation style, such as the replica of the original rood beam, which is unique in Scotland. The church?s tower was inspired by a medieval church in Somerset, and it is even possible to find Japanese influences in the double beams and pendants inside the church.

Queen?s Cross Church also contains exceptional relief carving on wood and stonework with mainly plants and birds designs, whose meanings are still nowadays a mystery to experts. The building functioned as a Parish Church until 1976 when, after facing threat of demolition, the Society started looking after it.

Scotland on TV have a video of the church if you want to see first hand the beuty of the place

Address: Queens Cross Church, 870 Garscube Rd, Glasgo
Directions: Is not situated in the centre of Glasgow, but a taxi from the city centre won't be expensive, there are many buses going there from the city centre and is a 10 min. walk from the St. George's Cross Underground.

Review Helpfulness: 2.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Updated Apr 4, 2011
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