"Konigstrasse and its Secular Buildings" Top 5 Page for this destination Nürnberg Things to Do Tip by nicolaitan

Nürnberg Things to Do: 539 reviews and 1,273 photos

  Toll House
by nicolaitan
  • Toll House - Nürnberg
      Toll House
    by nicolaitan
  • Toll House - Nürnberg
      Toll House
    by nicolaitan
  • Nassauer Haus - Nürnberg
      Nassauer Haus
    by nicolaitan
  • Konigstrasse and its Secular Buildings - Nürnberg

The main thoroughfare of old Nuremberg runs from the main train station - Frauentor northwest to the main square (Hauptmarkt) becoming Burgstrasse and leading directly to the castle. Along the way is a scenic crossing of the Pegnitz River, the important churches of Nuremberg, and several important secular buildings. Always the busiest street in Nuremberg, it was largely pedestrianized after construction of the U-Bahn and is the main walking promenade. It is lined by abundant shopping, many restaurants and cafes, and a number of hotels especially nearer the train station.

The most striking secular building is the Mauthalle (Toll Hall) constructed by town architect Hans Beheim between 1498-1502 on the site of the next to last town wall and moat. As an independent city, Nuremberg was subject to siege and warfare, and this building was one of multiple grain and corn storehouses. Three stories high and constructed of local sandstone, it has 5 attic levels each with a row of windows creating an interesting facade. Small windows also fit through the steep roof along the sides of the building.The city coat of arms over the entrance was carved by Adam Kraft, one of Germany's most famous sculptors. After 1572, the building also served as a customs hours, hence the name. It was sold to a religious order in 1898 and used for commercial offices. Heavily damaged in WWII, it has been reconstructed faithfully and now houses a large restaurant and famous beer hall. Only the eastern wall is original.

Nassau Hall - across from St. Lorenz Church - is considered one of Europe's best preserved medieval tower houses, usually occupied by aristocrats. The artistic fortifcations are just for decoration. The lower stories date from the early 1200's with the upper stories added in the 1420's. In 1431, King Sigismund pawned his crown to the owner of the building who then added the rooftop parapet with the emperor's coat of arms. It remains in private hands today, reconstructed after considerable WWII damage.

Review Helpfulness: 4.5 out of 5 stars

Was this review helpful?

  • Updated Nov 17, 2007
  • Send to a Friend
  • Add to your Trip Planner
  • Report Abuse



“Tomorrow is but another page in god's coloring book”

Online Now


Top 1,000 Travel Writer
Member Rank:
0 0 1 2 2
Forum Rank:
0 0 1 1 5

Have you been to Nürnberg?

  Share Your Travels