"Driving in the Mountains" Top 5 Page for this destination Morocco Off The Beaten Path Tip by JamalMorelli

Morocco Off The Beaten Path: 232 reviews and 403 photos

  When the sidewalk ends - photo Jamal Morelli
by JamalMorelli
 
  • When the sidewalk ends - photo Jamal Morelli - Morocco
      When the sidewalk ends - photo Jamal Morelli
    by JamalMorelli
  • Mr Jamal drives the drive - Imlil - Morocco
      Mr Jamal drives the drive - Imlil
    by JamalMorelli
  • no barriers - photo Jamal Morelli - Morocco
      no barriers - photo Jamal Morelli
    by JamalMorelli
  • no barriers2 - photo Jamal Morelli - Morocco
      no barriers2 - photo Jamal Morelli
    by JamalMorelli
  • Then there is foot traffic- photo Jamal Morelli - Morocco
      Then there is foot traffic- photo Jamal Morelli
    by JamalMorelli
 

It is so, so beautiful - but the drivers (and periodically the roads) up there can be both terrifying and lethal. The drive itself scares some of my friends, even though I would put it up there with the world's wonders. I have a friend who justs pops some weird dramamine/valium combo to calm the car sickness he experiences. (He does that so he can enjoy the spectacular views.)

If it is your first time there: Do not drive at night. Period.

Summary: I would not miss it for anything. VTer Angiebabe is this particular activity's biggest proponent. Ask her about and watch the poetry flow.

Drive super safe, beware of dumb*sses disguised as grand taxis, pick up something for the carsickness at a pharmacy (if it's really a big problem for you) and dive in.

UPDATE: Night after every other night, there are overturned buses on Moroccan TV - be supercareful up there; don't drive like me.

See also under Dangers and Warnings 'The Roads which So Truly Suck'

Secondary routes in rural areas are often narrow and poorly paved. Roads through the Rif and Atlas mountains are steep, narrow, windy, and dangerous. Maximum caution should be exercised when driving in the mountains. Pedestrians, scooters, and animal-drawn conveyances are common on all roadways, including the freeways, and driving at night should be avoided, if possible. During the rainy season (November - March) flash flooding is frequent and sometimes severe, washing away roads and vehicles in rural areas. Often Moroccan police officers pull over drivers for inspection within the city and on highways. In the event of a traffic accident, including accidents involving injuries, the parties are required to remain at the scene and not move their vehicles until the police have arrived and documented all necessary information. The police emergency services telephone number is 190.

Source for Road safety in Morocco

Website: http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_975.html

Review Helpfulness: 2.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Updated Dec 1, 2006
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