"FRENCH CARS & FUEL CHARGES" Driving Tip by thinking

Driving, Paris: 20 reviews and 24 photos

The French are loyal to their own brands.
Renault is the largest automaker, followed by Peugeot and Citroen, the latter two being part of the same company but with distinct models.Japanese cars are seldom seen in France, even though Renault controls Nissan. American cars are a rarity.

Citroen makes the C3 Pluriel, which is in the same vein as the Mini or VW Beetle, except this is a modern version of the 2CV (Deux Chevaux), one of the most recognizable French cars of the post-war era. The Pluriel has the same sliding roof, except it's electric, and there is also a convertible. It's a modern car in every way, a two-door with styling that hints at the 2CV.

Peugeot models have a 7 at the end at the end of their numeric designations. For instance, the 207 is a small in-town runabout and the 607 is a luxury car. Outside, the latter looks a lot like the Acura 3.2 TL. Inside, the 607 is all leather and wood, like other entry-level luxury cars with which it competes.

60 per cent of new cars sold in France are diesels. Not only do diesel cars get better fuel mileage than gasoline models, but the French government encourages fuel economy by putting heavier licence taxes on bigger engines.

Diesel fuel also costs a lot less in France -- usually about 35 cents a litre less compared with a litre of gasoline. Even with those price differences, the fuel-efficient French usually spend less in a year on driving than anyone in North America.

Type: Car/Motor Home

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  • Updated Apr 4, 2011
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