"FREEDOM FRIES" Paris Warnings Or Dangers Tip by thinking

Paris Warnings and Dangers: 867 reviews and 512 photos

  FREEDOM FRIES NOW SHOWN WITH PRIDE IN FRANCE
by thinking
 
 

I ?m not sure something ever made the U.S. look as foolish, petty, bigoted and intolerant than renaming French fries to Freedom Fries. By an act of Congress no less! Well, it?s over. The name is gone, at last.

No WMDs in Iraq, no flowers and no peace either. The reality of the facts on the ground has caught up with this Congress, and while they will never admit it, the French were right on that one and they know it. Having Freedom Fries on the menu to remind them of it every day must have been more than they can bear.

3+ years of this nonsense! What a bunch of nitwits!

Note #1: Edward Jones (R-NC), the man behind the decision to change the name, had already said he regretted it, and has now turned strongly anti-war. The other Congressman behind it, Bob Ney of Ohio, might soon have to check what they have on? the jail menu. A little bit of satisfaction today: Republican Congressman Bob Ney of Ohio has stepped down from his job of chairman of the House Administration Committee.

Ney is at the center of lobbyist Jack Abramoff?s corruption scandal. He is alleged to have received favors from Abramoff in return for supporting legislation beneficial to one of Abramoff?s clients. As many as 40 Congressmen might be implicated in the scandal.
He was also the guy that led the push to rename the French fries in the House cafeterias ?freedom fries? to protest France?s refusal to back the U.S. invasion of Iraq. It was in his role as the panel?s chairman that he ordered the name change1.
And to make sure everyone understood how brainless he was, he also renamed French toasts ?freedom toasts?.

Note #2: There are idiots everywhere, and during every period. in France during World War I, the coffee with whipped cream, previously known as Café Viennois (Vienna coffee) was renamed Café Liégeois (Coffee from Liège) to honor the defense of the city against the Germans. This appellation is still in use today, mainly for ice-creams (chocolat liégeois and café liegeois).

Review Helpfulness: 2.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Written Aug 3, 2006
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