"Guns and American Indians holocaust" Top 5 Page for this destination National Museum of the American Indian Tip by matcrazy1

  MUSKETS IN AMERICAN INDIAN MUSEUM 2
by matcrazy1
 
  • MUSKETS IN AMERICAN INDIAN MUSEUM 2 - Washington D.C.
      MUSKETS IN AMERICAN INDIAN MUSEUM 2
    by matcrazy1
  • MUSKETS IN AMERICAN INDIAN MUSEUM - Washington D.C.
      MUSKETS IN AMERICAN INDIAN MUSEUM
    by matcrazy1
  • GUNS IN AMERICAN INDIAN MUSEUM 1 - Washington D.C.
      GUNS IN AMERICAN INDIAN MUSEUM 1
    by matcrazy1
  • GUNS IN AMERICAN INDIAN MUSEUM 2 - Washington D.C.
      GUNS IN AMERICAN INDIAN MUSEUM 2
    by matcrazy1
  • GUNS IN AMERICAN INDIAN MUSEUM 3 - Washington D.C.
      GUNS IN AMERICAN INDIAN MUSEUM 3
    by matcrazy1
 

In the National Museum of the American Indian I've seen a huge, impressive collection of steel swords and guns (including early muskets called arquebus) brought to the Americas by Europeans.

On the display titled "Three reasons why" I've got to know that swords, diseases and complex political conditions enabled Europeans to exploit the Americas. Natives people had no answer for European weapons: first steel swords, then guns. New diseases brought from Europe swept the hemisphere decimating native populations and significantly weakining resistance to invasion. Europeans exploited rivalries among Native people to defeat the largest American empires - the Aztec and the Inka.

By the late 15th century, a minority of European foot soldiers were already equipped with "hand cannons", however these were extremely inaccurate and difficult to load and fire, often more dangerous for shooter than their targets. In the 16th century, the hand held firearm became commonplace and by the 17th century it replaced the pike and sword as the main infantry weapon.



Address: Fourth St. & Independence Ave., S.W. Washington DC
Directions: Metro station: Federal Center SW. On southern part of the eastern end of the National Mall, between the Smithsonian's National Air & Space Museum and the U.S. Capitol Building. Map here
othercontact: NMAIcollections@si.edu
Phone: +1 (202) 633 1000
Website: http://www.nmai.si.edu

Review Helpfulness: 3.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Written Mar 10, 2006
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matcrazy1

“Keep smiling, take it easy :-)”

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