"Pizzaro, gold and the world's largest ransom" Top 5 Page for this destination National Museum of the American Indian Tip by matcrazy1

  GOLD DISPLAYED IN AMERICAN INDIAN MUSEUM
by matcrazy1
 
  • GOLD DISPLAYED IN AMERICAN INDIAN MUSEUM - Washington D.C.
      GOLD DISPLAYED IN AMERICAN INDIAN MUSEUM
    by matcrazy1
  • GOLD DISPLAYED IN AMERICAN INDIAN MUSEUM 2 - Washington D.C.
      GOLD DISPLAYED IN AMERICAN INDIAN MUSEUM 2
    by matcrazy1
  • GOLD DISPLAYED IN AMERICAN INDIAN MUSEUM 3 - Washington D.C.
      GOLD DISPLAYED IN AMERICAN INDIAN MUSEUM 3
    by matcrazy1
  • STONE FIGURINE IN AMERICAN INDIAN MUSEUM - Washington D.C.
      STONE FIGURINE IN AMERICAN INDIAN MUSEUM
    by matcrazy1
  • STONE FIGURINE IN AMERICAN INDIAN MUSEUM - Washington D.C.
      STONE FIGURINE IN AMERICAN INDIAN MUSEUM
    by matcrazy1
 

In the National Museum of the American Indian among numerous gold items and stone figurines I've found interesting information on Francisco Pizarro (ca. 1475 - 1541), a a Spanish conquistador, conqueror of the Inca Empire and founder of the city of Lima, the modern-day capital of Peru.

The information titled "Four roads. Eight months" says that in 1532, Pizzaro seized the Inka ruler Atahualpa and held him hostage. From across Peru, silver and gold arrived on the backs of people and llamas. They trudged along the empire's four highways, carrying the largest ransom in world history. It took eight months. A room 22 feet long, 17 feet wide, and eight feet high was filled with gold. Two more rooms were filled with silver. When the rooms could hold no more, Pizzaro became one of the world's richest men. He then ordered Atahualpa strangled.

Later I've got to know that though Pizarro is well known in Peru for being the leader behind the Spanish conquest of the Inca Empire, many (most?) Peruvians regard him as a historical kind of criminal. However Pizzaro's monuments from 1930' stand in Wisconsin, canada, in Trujillo, Spain, and in Lima, Peru. Indigenous and mixed-raced majority of Peru requests the equestrian statue of Pizarro in Lima to be removed. In 2003 the statue the mayor of Lima approved that the statue be transferred to another place but not to remove it.



Address: Fourth St. & Independence Ave., S.W. Washington DC
Directions: Metro station: Federal Center SW. On southern part of the eastern end of the National Mall, between the Smithsonian's National Air & Space Museum and the U.S. Capitol Building. Map here
othercontact: NMAIcollections@si.edu
Phone: +1 (202) 633 1000
Website: http://www.nmai.si.edu

Review Helpfulness: 3.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Written Mar 10, 2006
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matcrazy1

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