"American Indians, stone figures, casinos" Top 5 Page for this destination National Museum of the American Indian Tip by matcrazy1

  STONE FIGURE OF AMERICAN INDIANS
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  • STONE FIGURE OF AMERICAN INDIANS - Washington D.C.
      STONE FIGURE OF AMERICAN INDIANS
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  • STONE FIGURE OF AMERICAN INDIANS 2 - Washington D.C.
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  • STONE FIGURES OF AMERICAN INDIANS 5 - Washington D.C.
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I've seen a lot of stone figures made by American Indians in the National Museum of the American Indian. I saw them in various gift shops as well as sold ny American Indians in the West, especially in northern New Mexico and Arizona.

But my first meeting with Indian culture in the USA refers to... gambling and casinos. Surprisingly I didn't see any casino during my first days in the USA, in San Diego agglomeration. As soon as I hit my car eastwards towards Yuma in Arizona, I found large Golden Acorn Casino located in Campo, California. To my surprise the casino was located nowhere, I mean in the middle of empty, deserted area. I surely asked about it my waitress in casino bar and she explained me that casinos in California are located in Indian Territories as they are banned on state grounds. I couldn't understand it at first.

Now, I know that American Indian minorities (563 tribes) have some special federal rights: the right to form their own government; to enforce laws, both civil and criminal; to tax; to establish membership; to license and regulate activities; to zone; and to exclude persons from tribal territories. Limitations on tribal powers of self-government include the same limitations applicable to states; for example, neither tribes nor states have the power to make war, engage in foreign relations, or coin money. For me, as a foreign visitor, the best seen consequence of these rights, were just those nmerous casinos always put up on Indian grounds (exception: Nevada).



Address: Fourth St. & Independence Ave., S.W. Washington DC
Directions: Metro station: Federal Center SW. On southern part of the eastern end of the National Mall, between the Smithsonian's National Air & Space Museum and the U.S. Capitol Building. Map here
othercontact: NMAIcollections@si.edu
Phone: +1 (202) 633 1000
Website: http://www.nmai.si.edu

Review Helpfulness: 2.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Written Mar 10, 2006
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matcrazy1

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