"Modern and contemporary art" Top 5 Page for this destination Smithsonian Institute Museums / National Zoo Tip by matcrazy1

  HIRSHORN MUSEUM BUILDING
by matcrazy1
 
  • HIRSHORN MUSEUM BUILDING - Washington D.C.
      HIRSHORN MUSEUM BUILDING
    by matcrazy1
  • "TWO DISCS" BY ALEXANDER CALDER - Washington D.C.
      "TWO DISCS" BY ALEXANDER CALDER
    by matcrazy1
  • IN SCULPTURE GARDEN - Washington D.C.
      IN SCULPTURE GARDEN
    by matcrazy1
  • KATHY AND ART - Washington D.C.
      KATHY AND ART
    by matcrazy1
  • HIRSHORN MUSEUM BUILDING, KATHY AND CHRIS - Washington D.C.
      HIRSHORN MUSEUM BUILDING, KATHY AND CHRIS
    by matcrazy1
 

Favorite thing: Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden is a very interesting collection of the 20th century art especially for those crazies who love various strange three-dimensional compositions made by people who named thesemselves artists and can influence many, them to call them geniuses of art, to publicise and eventually to buy their artworks at highly unreasonable price.

Fondest memory: Well, anyway, I like to look at them, I mean works of art not their difficult authors (well, they all passsed away, where are successors?) like:

1
. Alexander Calder (American, 1898?1976); very ambitious; he first became an engineer but unfortunatelly instead of building bridges and highways in a just borning car country he went to Paris where he - weak character - followed his new friends and started to build abstractions in motion later called "mobiles", moving (kinetic) sculptures. When it had become to be boring he continued with "stabiles." I've seen his mobiles in Berlin, Germany recently.I would love to see one in my yard.

2.
Henry Moore (British, 1898-1986); he wanted to create sculptures which represent dignity, monumentality, power, and timelessness, something close to minds of those in power, but he was very unstable and was changing his style so often that looking at his works of art I usually can't proudly say: "look, that's Moore."

3.
Auguste Rodin (French, 1840 - 1917); he must had been always unemployed as he managed to create unbelievable number of sculptures including human beings in move but without a head. He was a good and sensitive observer, I see or his skills were limited, a head is a difficult part for each artist; well, maybe the Smithsonians couldn't afford his headed sculptures. I saw huge collection of his sculptures across the Mall in National Art Gallery West Building 3 days before, DC must love him, boring...

Let me add one more name I didn't know before:
4.
Juan Munoz (Spanish, 1953 - 2001).
I liked a lot his composition of 3 + 1 + 1 almost human statues (Last Conversation Piece, 1994-95) standing on a lawn outdoors.

Review Helpfulness: 3.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Updated Jan 16, 2006
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matcrazy1

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