"The two Walls which changed the world" Top 5 Page for this destination Gdansk Things to Do Tip by matcrazy1

Gdansk Things to Do: 537 reviews and 1,498 photos

  THE GDANSK SHIPYARD WALL AND URSZULA
by matcrazy1
 
  • THE GDANSK SHIPYARD WALL AND URSZULA - Gdansk
      THE GDANSK SHIPYARD WALL AND URSZULA
    by matcrazy1
  • THE BERLIN WALL - Gdansk
      THE BERLIN WALL
    by matcrazy1
  • THE BERLIN WALL, CLOSER LOOK - Gdansk
      THE BERLIN WALL, CLOSER LOOK
    by matcrazy1
  • THE GDANSK SHIPYARD WALL - Gdansk
      THE GDANSK SHIPYARD WALL
    by matcrazy1
  • THE POLISH AND ENGLISH INFO - Gdansk
      THE POLISH AND ENGLISH INFO
    by matcrazy1
 

There are two parts of the two walls in the "Roads to Freedom" exposition: Berlin Wall and the Gdansk shipyard wall. Both symbolise changes in Europe and the world in the end of 20th century.

The Berlin Wall is the world's most known wall, no doubt. It seperated the two quite different worlds till 1990 and beame a symbol of divided Europe:
- 1/3 (Western Europe) which belonged to the world of prosperity, welfare and freedom (or in words of communist propaganda: the world of high unemployment, high crime rate and freedom exclusively for rulers)
- 2/3 of Europe which belonged to the world of slavery, terror and poverty (or following political corectivness - not true but... - the world of "limited freedom", "unfair persecutions of some small minorities" and "a bit slower economic development in 1980'").

The process which lead to tearing down the Berlin Wall started on 14th August, 1980, when Lech Walesa, an electrician publicly unknown at that time, jumped over the wall fencing the Gdansk shipyard and became the strike leader. Since that time, the phrase "to jump over the wall" has changed its direct meaning in Polish language and has become an idiom in slang language. It means to change things (in a positive way) or to overcome, to win. Haha, the wall is some 2.5 m high. Walesa had to be a fit man that time.

The new, private owners of Gdansk shipyard had to tear down that famous wall, but thanks to many locals, the part of this wall survived and was transferred to the exposition. Now, there is a short historical information in Polish and English given by the wall.



Address: Ul. Doki 1, Gdansk
Directions: On the grounds of former Gdansk shipyard. About 15 min. on foot from the Main Railway Station (Gdansk Glowny): go northwards to Solidarity Square, pass through the shipyard gate right to the Monument to the Fallen Shipyard Workers.
Phone: +48 (58) 769 29 20
Website: http://www.inyourpocket.com/poland/gdansk/en/venue?id=POGDENX0036

Review Helpfulness: 3.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Updated Nov 23, 2005
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matcrazy1

“Keep smiling, take it easy :-)”

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