"Living in Colonial America" Top 5 Page for this destination United States of America Things to Do Tip by grandmaR

United States of America Things to Do: 953 reviews and 1,331 photos

  1762 NY Courtesy, Winterthur Museum
by grandmaR
 
  • 1762 NY Courtesy, Winterthur Museum - United States of America
      1762 NY Courtesy, Winterthur Museum
    by grandmaR
  • C 1740 Crewel bedroom VA, Courtesy Winterthur - United States of America
      C 1740 Crewel bedroom VA, Courtesy Winterthur
    by grandmaR
  • c 1764 Philadelphia parlor, Courtesy Winterthur - United States of America
      c 1764 Philadelphia parlor, Courtesy Winterthur
    by grandmaR
  • c 1730 MD bedroom Courtesy Winterthur - United States of America
      c 1730 MD bedroom Courtesy Winterthur
    by grandmaR
  • Massachusetts highboy Courtesy Winterthur - United States of America
      Massachusetts highboy Courtesy Winterthur
    by grandmaR
 

When we lived in Philadelphia in 1969, I visited Winterthur Museum. When this country was first settled, much of the quality furniture was imported from Europe, and most of the furniture collectors collected European antiques. But much elegant furniture was also manufactured in the colonies. H. F. duPont had an epiphany where he was struck with the idea that American antiques were equality deserving and he bought a massive collection of pre-Revolutionary American furniture.

He not only bought the furniture, but he bought the walls and surroundings right out of the house and displayed it as it would have been when it was new.

The first picture is of the parlour in the Hardenbergh House c. 1762 in Kerhonkson NY. Note the powder horn over the mantle and the wrought iron candle stand next to the fireplace. In addition to the fireplace and the furniture, the paneling and beams also came from the original house.

Other pictures depict the Richie House in Tappahannock VA c 1740 with crewel bed hangings, Blackwell Parlour from Philadelphia c 1740, A Maryland bedroom from Cecil County c 1730 also with crewel embroidery, and a Queen Anne japanned highboy from Massachusetts.

Winterthur Museum is worth visiting if you are interested in furniture. They had specialty tours, and I took two of them - one of them was about decorating with textiles, which is why I bought the slides with the crewel embroidered linens pictured.

Family-friendly tours are open to all ages. Adults, $20; students/seniors (age 62+), $18

Even if you can't visit Winterthur, there are many sites which have original furnishings which will give a visitor a good idea of how it was to live in the days when this country was a colony.

I have obtained permission from Susan I. Newton, Photographic Services Winterthur Museum and Country Estate to use this picture. The original slide has become red with age.

Address: Rte. 52 (Kennett Pike) in Delaware 19735
Directions: From Baltimore

* Take 95 North to Wilmington; take exit 7, which is Delaware Avenue/Rte. 52
* Travel three blocks to Rte. 52; take a left at light
* Stay in left-most lane to stay on Rte. 52 North
* Winterthur is on Rte. 52, six mi NW of Wilmington

Phone: 800.448.3883
Website: http://www.winterthur.org/about/garden_estate.asp

Review Helpfulness: 3.5 out of 5 stars

Was this review helpful?

  • Updated Oct 7, 2005
  • Send to a Friend
  • Add to your Trip Planner
  • Report Abuse

Comments

grandmaR

“"..an adventure is an inconvenience rightly considered." G.K. Chesterton”

Online Now

Female

Top 1,000 Travel Writer
Member Rank:
0 0 0 2 5
Forum Rank:
0 0 0 7 0

Have you been to United States of America?

  Share Your Travels