San Leo Off The Beaten Path Tips by von.otter Top 5 Page for this destination

San Leo Off The Beaten Path: 4 reviews and 20 photos

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Doorknockers of San Leo, June 2010 - San Leo

Doorknockers of San Leo, June 2010

Doorknockers of San Leo

“At last we arrived at San Leo. This castle of the ancient and powerful lords of Montefeltro was erected before the tenth century or thereabouts. It is seated on the top of a very elevated cone like the rock of the Appenines, and dominates all the neighbouring castles, opposite the hill on which is seated the ancient town and republic of San Marino.”
— from “Memoirs and Adventures of Felice Orsini” 1857 by Felice Orsini (1819-1858)

If you have doors, as we have seen that San Leo does, a doorknocker is needed.

I could only find two leo styled knocker (see photos #4 & #5), however.

Review Helpfulness: 2.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Updated Dec 20, 2012
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Impressions of San Leo, Italy, June 2010 - San Leo

Impressions of San Leo, Italy, June 2010

Impressions of San Leo

“The Italians practically live out of doors, and the fresh air and their naturally wholesome diet is their salvation. In the mountain districts they are bright, sturdy and strong, and though people at home do not generally realize it, our immigrants come mostly from these mountainous sections; for there are mountains in almost every part of Italy. But strong and healthy as the women are, they use their strength to the utmost. They give but a few days to childbirth, and a week finds them again doing their housework, and washing in the river; at the age of forty they are old and tired, while many of the upper classes, who have practically all the luxuries, remain young and handsome way into the sixties.”
— from “Italian Castles and Country Seats” 1911 by Tryphosa Bates Batcheller (1876–1952)

Here are some quirky impressions of the sweet little town of San Leo.

Photo #1 — The fleur-de-lys, called il giglio in Italian, is the symbol of Florence. This stone version is above the door of Palazzo Medici, which is not the Museum of Art in San Leo.

Photo #2 — A mailbox in the shape of a house.

Photo #3 — The papal triple tiara and the coat-of-arms of della Rovere family can be found on Palazzo della Rovere.

Photo #4 — A quaint lace curtain with ducks.

Photo #5 — von.otter stopping to smell the roses in San Leo.

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  • Updated Mar 22, 2011
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Coat-of-Arms of San Leo, June 2010 - San Leo

Coat-of-Arms of San Leo, June 2010

Coat-of-Arms of San Leo

“San Leo was not disappointing.”
— from “Wayfarers in Italy” 1901 by Katharine Hooker

It is a truth that even the smallest villages in Europe have its own coat-of-arms. I love these ‘logos,’ usually created from historic events taking place within, or nearby to, the village; or the town has adopted and adapted the coat-of-arms of a prominent noble family in or nearby to the village.

For the coat-of-arms of San Leo, St. Francis of Assisi, preaching under an elm tree, appears on the left-hand side. To right of Our Saint is a black, two-headed eagle. The whole affair is topped by a crown and a scroll bearing the village’s 1902 motto: Vetusta Feretrana Civitas Invicta Sancti Leonis.

The reason for including St. Francis of Assisi is that Our Saint visited San Leo on a preaching mission in 1213. The reason for including the eagle is that during the friction between the Holy Fathers (the popes) and the Holy Roman Emperors, the village sided with the emperor.

Review Helpfulness: 2 out of 5 stars

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  • Updated Mar 15, 2011
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Doors of San Leo, June 2010 - San Leo

Doors of San Leo, June 2010

Doors of San Leo

“The Italian peasants grow old quickly because they begin life so young and work so hard. They are often married at fourteen, and by the time they are twenty have many cares, and already a numerous family. They have few, if any, of the luxuries of life, but they have what no poor of other countries have to the same extent — a glorious climate.”
— from “Italian Castles and Country Seats” 1911 by Tryphosa Bates Batcheller (1876–1952)

Wandering through the small village of San Leo, I was struck by the number of Roman-arched doors as entry ways to ordinary buildings.

Some of the door surrounds look quite old. These monumental entry ways lend a note of grandeur to another wise ordinary building.

Review Helpfulness: 3 out of 5 stars

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  • Updated Mar 7, 2011
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