Norway Warnings Or Dangers Tips by Saagar Top 5 Page for this destination

Norway Warnings and Dangers: 116 reviews and 84 photos

Glittertind mountain, late July - Norway

Glittertind mountain, late July

Hypothermia in the mountains

The local saying here goes: "There is no such thing as bad weather, only bad clothing!"
If you are surprised by a sudden change of weather, especially in the mountains, you are in danger of succumbing to hypothermia if your are not properly prepared - you may loose coherence and eventually freeze to death. Remember that 1000 meters above sea level in Norway climatically roughly compares to 3000 meters in the Alps. Rain- and wind-proof clothing with layering options and long underwear in your back pack is the order of the day if you venture in high and remote places. Also, do not go by yourself unprepared for freak events. Check the photo, too, it is taken in July....

Review Helpfulness: 4.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Updated Nov 16, 2005
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The Mosquito's Competitor: the Midge

Midge or blackfly; the Norwegian name is "knott".
The midge is generally seen as more of an evil pest than the mosquito. They are quietly stealthy, tiny and attack you in alarming masses, and their tiny stings itch like h... .
They prefer grassland, leafy bushes and heathery, tussocky coast lands, birch-clad hills and riverbanks. Just after sundown on a clear day they will ruin you barbecue, best angling and your sunset calm. On a gray, rainy, and in particular warm day, they will be out in force just after the beating rain has ceased. You can try the same things as against mosquitos, but because of their size, they will creep up your wrists, underneath your hood, easily find their way to your 1 square millimeter exposed lower back skin, get behind your sunglasses, in and around your ears. They may drive you to desperation. They also tend to laugh at the various sort of repellent you try against them.
Do this: Go inside - after a while they will again take shelter in the grass and underneath their homely leaves, and you can re-emerge. Or, get your hat and mosquito net, but this time with an extra fine net - ask for a net with a very fine mesh that keeps the "knott" out.
The good news is that the midges do not leave a long-lasting itch.

Review Helpfulness: 4.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Updated Feb 28, 2004
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Veobreen glacier, East Jotunheimen - Norway

Veobreen glacier, East Jotunheimen

Glaciers kill tourists every year

Glaciers are dangerous; many tourists seem not to acknowledge this. The accessible glaciers (near roads and tourist facilities) tend to be well marked with unobtrusive danger-signs and symbolic fences. Many times I have seen tourists pass this signage and climbed onto or even underneath the glaciers. There is just no way to know when a glacier cave or ice towers will collapse. Likewise, many tourists venture out on glaciers without necessary safety equipment and without being roped together. It is important to understand that glaciers are moving and are plastic. They do not move with a sudden crash, but slide and move over uneven rock and down slopes with different speed in different parts of the glacier. That's why crevasses develop and close, ice towers up and ice blocks are pushed over rock edges. Locals will know how the glacier behave, and tell you where to go and how. Moreover, there are qualified glacier guides many places who can take you across or just for a walk. Some places offer regular tours, others guided glacier crossings as part of mountain hikes. These are not tourist traps. That's also the case for the warnings - they are not trying to divert your attention to their company services, but are genuine, even low-key warnings.
Again, in 2005 there have been several accidents on glaciers involving tourists - especially Eastern European trekkers not heeding local advice. Juvassbreen glacier toward the Galdhøpiggen peak is especially accident-prone.

Other Contact: Local tourist offices

Review Helpfulness: 3.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Updated Aug 22, 2005
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The Mosquito Plague

Several VT members comment on the prevalence of mosquitoes in Norway, rightly so. Here is a run-down on what they do to you and how you can deal with them:
Mosquitoes: several species, none carrying any diseases. They breed in shallow, still water and certain species need mammals' blood to procreate. That's why they come with a Stuka-like "...eeeeeEEEEEeeeeeEEEeeee!!!!!" and sting you with their IV-type trunks. Twin-engine-types are rumored.
The post-sting itching comes from an anti-coagulant that they inject in your skin, and that irritates the local area. Too many stings can lead to an allergic reaction.

They have certain periods of the summer when they are particularily active, correlating to specific humidity and temperature factors. Warm weather just after rain is a sure time. Normally staying out of the sunlight in Southern Norway (in the north they have no option), and will come out at low sun and will be on the prowl in the evening.
They prefer humid areas - the sheltered coast, generally, otherwise marshy areas and humid forest and grasslands.
They do generally stay grounded during windy conditions.
To avoid them entirely, the outer coast and the high mountains and snowfields are the best options.
The best protection is to use a light cotton anorak or any windproofy with a drawstring hood. On exposed body areas you can use a mosquito repellent that you like. Maximum DEET content permitted for sale in Norway is 20% due to health reasons, and you should not use DEET on infants' skin. To ease the stings afterwards, the medication Eurax will help.
If you are out and about, active and do not want the restraint of a hood, use a brimmed hat or cap, buy a hat-sized mosquito net in a sports goods store to put over it. Very efficient. Zip up your tent at night!

Review Helpfulness: 3.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Updated Feb 28, 2004
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Wading a creek in Jotunheimen - Norway

Wading a creek in Jotunheimen

Wading mountain rivers

When hiking in the mountains in Norway, you will occasionally have to cross that darn river or rushing creek.
Shoes off, socks, pants.
With a stick for support, or one of these telescopic walking staffs, you should be ready?
Perhaps not: rivers can be very cold and glacial opaque and you neigh loose your feeling in the feet. Rocks may be very sharp and cut you underfoot, too.
For a safer wading, use rubber/plastic sandals, Tevas and the like. They are excellent for such a purpose, and come in handy later on your travel, too.

Review Helpfulness: 3.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Written Feb 27, 2004
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Red jellyfish - Norway

Red jellyfish

The red and blue jellyfishes

Very common toward the end of summer, the red jellyfish can be a menace. It stings and burns like a nettle if the tentacles are touched, but there are a lot of tentacles so it can hurt quite a bit. But not very dangerous unless there is an allergy case.
Vinegar kills off the effect of the burns.
Look out before you dive in, and in the high season, perhaps use a surfer's shirt or normal t-shirt.

The blue variety hurts more, but is found in deeper water and they are rarely as many as the red ones. But it can be mistaken for the glassy jellyfish, which children like to play with.

Review Helpfulness: 3.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Written Jun 10, 2004
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Cost of traffic violations

It's costly to violate traffic regulations in Norway. These are the current rates for some violations (1 EUR = NOK 8):
- Driving against red light: NOK 5200
- Ignoring traffic signs: NOK 4200
- Driving across dividing lines, sidewalks, bike paths etc.: NOK 3200
- Illegal overtaking: NOK 5200
- Ignoring right-of-way NOK 5200
- Ignoring giving proper light signals, faulty lights: NOK 2000
- Use of hand-held mobile phone: NOK 1300

There are various regulations other than these, including for accounting for multi-violations of traffic regulations. Don't try wringing your hands, saying you have no money - the police takes cards, too - on the spot!

Other Contact: Check w Norwegian police

Review Helpfulness: 3.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Updated Aug 11, 2005
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Cost of speeding on Norwegian roads

This is the cost of speeding on roads with speed limit 60 km/h or less:
+ 5 km/h NOK 600
+10 km/h NOK 1600
+15 km/h NOK 2900
+20 km/h NOK 4200
+25 km/h NOK 6500
(above: confiscation of driving licence)

This is the cost of speeding on raods with speed limits 70 km/h or more:
+5 NOK 600
+10 NOK 1600
+15 NOK 2600
+20 NOK 3600
+25 NOK 4900
+30 NOK 6500
+35 NOK 7800
(above: confiscation of driving licence).

Other Contact: Check w Norwegian police

Review Helpfulness: 3.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Written Jun 4, 2005
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Volatile musk oxen in the Dovre area

Musk oxen seem very docile and tame - but lo and behold! are they volatile. The closest comparison is the Indian rhino: its faint glimmer of thought that this may be an enemy is immediately followed by a charge...
Many tourists try to get quite close for that spectaclular photo or close-to-nature experience. Just know that the danger zone set by Norwegian wildlife authorities (at Dovre National Park) is no less than 400 meters, 200 on guided walk-in safaris. Closer than that and you are at risk of being charged, flipped and torn by irritated musk oxen. There may be a warning, typically snorts and stomping or a family group or small herd backing up bum-to-bum in a defensive circle or semi-circle with the young ones in the middle. Or there may be a charge with absolutely no warning. Yes, they may seek to run away most often, but do you chance it doesn't?
A particular dangerous situation is when you are moving through dense brush with limited sight and stumble upon one real close, and startle it. Stølådalen valley is a venue where this may happen. Despite their size they are quiet and hard to spot.
Another dangerous situation is when young or very old males are pressed out of the herd and start long migrations. They tend to be the angriest ones and frequently end up as the main dish in the local hotel or restaurant if they do not behave well.
Musk oxen are quite stupid and rarely learn anything if kept in captivity.They are known to have chased trains on the Dovre line. Not smart. In fact, along the Dovre railway line is one of the best places to see them if not hiking into the wilderness of Dovre mountain plateau (Hjerkinn or Kongsvoll railway stations) and west of the tracks in Drivdalen, especially up Stølådalen. But do not go early in the season when they have calves.
Curiosity killed the cat as it's said; at Dovre statistics show Germans are most likely to end ups as musk oxen rugs.

Review Helpfulness: 3.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Updated Sep 14, 2005
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SAS: cyber breakdown - Norway

SAS: cyber breakdown

SAS/Braathens internet bookings

The internet booking and generally web pages of SAS are terrible. They are made to have you browse around for solutions and info, not for getting your bookings done.
It has always been like this in my experience, and I have never managed to get one done (mind you, I have done it on other airlines, several times). The format doesn't always fit the request, and the numbers from cards don't fit the format, so you are always turned back. If you call them for booking, they slap on a percentage on the price. If you really want to do internet booking, try the airline company Norwegian instead of the SAS maze.

Their Eurobonus bonus travel program never worked with online booking. Also, the fax option is ignored.

Review Helpfulness: 3.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Written Feb 28, 2005
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