India Things to Do Tips by josephescu

India Things to Do: 1,013 reviews and 1,644 photos

4 more images
Pushkar - India

Pushkar

Pushkar - a colourful & quiet oasis

For the hindus, Pushkar is a holy little town, centered on a sacred lake that, according to legend, appeared at the spot where Lord Brahma dropped a lotus flower from the sky, which has made it an important Hindu pilgrimage site. Almost 400 milky coloured temples and many pale onion domes curl around the lake, among them, one of the few Brahma temples in the world.

On an international level, Pushkar is famous for its colourful camel fair, which takes place every October/November and attracts thousands of tourists.

All in all, Pushkar is a touristy destination, situated on the edge on the desert, with narrow lanes lined with shops, rooftop restaurants, small budget guesthouses outnumbering the temples and many, many pushy touts around “the lake”. Despite its high tourist profile, the town maintains some mystical charm which, accompanied with the “no motor traffic” in the centre, makes it a pleasant retreat before the next hop.

For more info, pics and tips go to my Pushkar pages.

Review Helpfulness: 2.5 out of 5 stars

Was this review helpful?

  • Written Sep 16, 2007
  • Send to a Friend
  • Report Abuse
4 more images
Jaisalmer fort - India

Jaisalmer fort

Jaisalmer - A desert outpost from Arabian Nights

Rising out of a vast, barren desert, Jaisalmer—the "Golden City"— is sheer magic. Dominated by its huge honey-coloured 800 years old fort, this remote desert outpost, once on the strategic trading route between central Asia and India, appears straight out of an Arabian Nights fable.
A marvel of beautiful culture and harsh climatic conditions, Jaisalmer boasts one of the oldest living forts in India, built on a hillock in the middle of the desert, with massive sandstone walls and 99 bastions, as well as the most breathtaking merchant houses (Haveli) in the whole India. Inside the fort, a large Raj Mahal (Royal palace) with delicate carvings, and 7 exuberant Jain temples of unequalled beauty.

A day is not enough to wander at these marvels, not to mention the camel desert treks…..

For more info, pics and tips go to my Jaisalmer page.

Review Helpfulness: 3.5 out of 5 stars

Was this review helpful?

  • Written Aug 26, 2007
  • Send to a Friend
  • Report Abuse
4 more images
Udaipur, India - India

Udaipur, India

A fairy tale city of lakes – Udaipur

Udaipur looks like it has been lifted straight from the pages of a fairy tale, with its rolling hills and whimsical palaces, including one in the middle of a lake. A small town, maybe somehow too touristy for some, but whose palaces and romantic vistas almost everybody is familiar with.
An imposing 16th century white palace on the shores of a sparkling lake, whose dozens of rooms, courtyards and artefacts are impressively rich, feeds perfectly the western cliché on Indian maharajahs. Intricately decorated carved temples hidden behind narrow streets, small lake islands, rooftop cafes and restaurants with lookout views over the city and the lake….a perfect romantic place for a few days.

For more info, pics and tips go to my my Udaipur page.

Review Helpfulness: 3.5 out of 5 stars

Was this review helpful?

  • Written Aug 26, 2007
  • Send to a Friend
  • Report Abuse
4 more images
Delhi - Jama Masjid - India

Delhi - Jama Masjid

Delhi - a capital for many

There’s an old saying the whoever establishes a new city at Delhi will lose it, and this has come true every time, i.e. 8 times already - from the hindu kingdom in the 12th century through the Moghuls and last, to the British Raj in the early 20th. A vibrant city of 13 million people concentrating life and history in one single place: old forts and temples, large mosques, bazaars and thoroughfare with chronically congested chowks. In addition, testimony of the colonial era, the New parts of Delhi, planned and built as the imperial capital for the British, systematised in parks and shaded avenues. Although the third largest city in India cannot boast the magnificent monuments scattered in other parts of the subcontinent, it is worth staying a couple of days.

For more info, pics and tips, visit my Delhi pages.

Review Helpfulness: 2.5 out of 5 stars

Was this review helpful?

  • Written Aug 19, 2007
  • Send to a Friend
  • Report Abuse
4 more images
the Koh-i-Noor of India - India
the Koh-i-Noor of India

It is difficult to put in one phrase reasons why Agra cannot be missed. From its history full of romantic scents of love stories and epic battles, to its world famous monuments, Agra is probably the most visited tourist destination in India.

My advice – go despite of tourist numbers, allow a day for the Taj (use the South Gate if the queue on the West Gate is too long), the Fort and the Mosque. Choose some cheap accommodation near the Taj and get up at dawn to see the Taj from the banks of the Yamuna river and stroll around the decrepit palaces hidden in the luxuriant vegetation on the river shores. Use the rest of the day for the Baby Taj….

For more info, pics an tips, can visit my Agra page.

Review Helpfulness: 3.5 out of 5 stars

Was this review helpful?

  • Written Apr 15, 2007
  • Send to a Friend
  • Report Abuse
4 more images
Varanasi - bathing ghat - India

Varanasi - bathing ghat

Varanasi – beating heart of the Hindu universe

I cannot think of a more shocking place to get the first contact with India than Varanasi. The City of Life or the City of Shiva as it is often referred to, Varanassi is “a beating heart of Hindu universe” and a living museum.

The Gange is the river of salvation, a symbol of hope to past, present and future generations of Hindus, so there’re plenty of motives which make Hindus come here - to wash away their sins or their clothes, to take the “communion” through a holy dip into the river, to feed the animals (cows included) or even to die, since dying here increases chances of liberation from the cycle of births and deaths.

Strolling around the bathing or cremation ghats on the Ganges shores from sunrise until night seems to be the preferred tourist activity, but don’t worry, tourists won’t probably represent more than 5% of all the people you’ll see on the Ganges shores, with another 5% being touts claiming to help you. The mix of practical and spiritual functions performed on the same spot, as well as their intensity and concentration, is astonishing. Religious celebrations after night fall close the circle of events of the day.

The drawback resides in the fact that this concentration of activities and people make the river and the town extremely polluted and malodorous. I would not recommend joining the Hindus for a holy dip in the Gange.

For more info, pics and tips can visit my Varanasi page.

Review Helpfulness: 3.5 out of 5 stars

Was this review helpful?

  • Updated Apr 12, 2007
  • Send to a Friend
  • Report Abuse

josephescu

“Tourists don't know where they've been, travelers don't know where they're going”

Online Now

Male

Top 1,000 Travel Writer
Member Rank:
0 0 3 9 9

Badges & Stats in India

  • 93 Reviews
  • 401 Photos
  • 0 Forum posts
  • 1,340PageViews
  • 7 Cities

Have you been to India?

  Share Your Travels  

Latest Activity in India

Travel Interests

See All Travel Interests (5)