French Polynesia Local Custom Tips by Helga67 Top 5 Page for this destination

French Polynesia Local Customs: 32 reviews and 26 photos

Tahitians - French Polynesia

Tahitians

Population

The majority of the people living in French Polynesia are the Maohi people, commonly referred to as Tahitians.

Next to the Tahitians, there are, of course, a lot of French people who came from France to work or live on the islands.

The "Demi" are the mixed blood.

The official language is French, but most people speak "Reo Maohi" among themselves.

Review Helpfulness: 4.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Updated Jul 25, 2004
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Tahiti Beach Press - French Polynesia

Tahiti Beach Press

Tahiti Beach Press

Tahiti Beach Press is a magazine in English that is published monthly and distributed to visitors through the hotels. It gives some good tips and what there is to do on the different islands and, of course, the necessary ads for local restaurants, guesthouses, hotels and shops.

Review Helpfulness: 2.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Written Jul 23, 2004
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PK - French Polynesia

PK

PK

PK = poste kilometre, the number of kilometers from the mairie (town hall) or post office.

When you are driving around the islands you will see the kilometer markers on the mountainside of the road. The markers are usually red-capped whited painted stone or concrete markers with the kilometer number painted in black on two sides. Many places use the PK markers as their address.

Review Helpfulness: 4.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Updated Jul 23, 2004
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CPF - French Polynesia

CPF

French Pacific Franc (CFP)

The money in French Polynesia are colourful notes of 500, 1000, 5000 and 10000 francs and coins of 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 francs.

The CFP has been anchored to the euro since 1999. 1euro = 119,33 CFP

If you change your dollars or euros at the bank for CFP, you will be charged about 500 CFP per transaction.

Most banks have an ATM, which is called distributeur.

Review Helpfulness: 4.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Updated Jul 23, 2004
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Raiatea - French Polynesia

Raiatea

Climate

The average temperature is 26.5°C (79.9°F) and rarely goes above 32°C (89.6°F). The prevailing winds are the easterly trade winds. In Winter (June to September) the Maraamu is a cool wind which blows from the southeast. The rainy season extends variably from December to April (alternating sunny and rainy spells).

Review Helpfulness: 4.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Written Jul 20, 2004
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Land crab - French Polynesia

Land crab

Tupa

Tupa is a land crab that lives in holes in the ground close to the lagoon . They look creepy and fearsome but as soon as you come too close they disappear into their holes.

Review Helpfulness: 2.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Written Jul 19, 2004
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Chicken - French Polynesia

Chicken

Chickens everywhere

When staying on the islands, you will notice a lot of chickens and roosters everywhere, and the roosters have the bad habit of crowing all day and night. I've heard of many tourists who couldn't sleep because of the roosters. But why are there so many?

There are no dangerous snakes or spiders on the islands. The only fearsome animal is the centipede, which lives in dark, humid areas, under rocks and in palm frond structures. Its bite is venomous and very painful to humans. The centipede is a delicacy for chickens that's why many people have chickens running around.

Review Helpfulness: 4.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Updated Jul 19, 2004
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Welcome

Tahitians have the custom to give a beautiful lei of Tiare flower as a welcome. The sweet scent of this white flower is really overwhelming but wonderful.

When you leave the island, you will receive a necklace of shells. This is the sign of the traveler.

Review Helpfulness: 4.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Updated Jul 19, 2004
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Ti plant - French Polynesia

Ti plant

The magical Ti-plant

This small tree is a sacred plant. Tahitians believe it possesses mystical and magical qualities that will protect the house from fire. Wherever you will see this plants around a house, you will know that there is a Tahitian family living in the house.

Even today, dancers, high priests and firewalkers still wear the green leaves of this tree for protection.

The ti is also used in traditional healing for diarrhea, vomiting, abscesses or ear infections.

Review Helpfulness: 4.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Written Jul 15, 2004
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Pineapple plantation on Moorrea - French Polynesia

Pineapple plantation on Moorrea

Economy

The islands live of its agriculture: coprah, pineapples, vanilla, citrus fruits, a little livestock farming, fishing and tourism.

Review Helpfulness: 3 out of 5 stars

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  • Written Jul 15, 2004
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Helga67

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