Antarctica Favorite Tips by Sharrie Top 5 Page for this destination

Antarctica Favorites: 120 reviews and 169 photos

I shall remember... the beauty, the grace... - Antarctica

I shall remember... the beauty, the grace...

My confession - The Song

Favorite thing: A song to remember...
A song to help me remember...
A song I cried everytime I listen to it...
A song that accompanied me the 4 days I was in Antarctica.
A song which will bring back the moments years after... (remember classical conditioning? that's what I did...)

MY CONFESSION

I have been blind
Unwilling
To see the true love
You're giving
I have ignored every blessing
I'm on my knees
Confessing...

That I feel myself surrender
Each time I see your face
I am staggered by your beauty
Your unassuming grace
And I feel my heart is turning
Falling into place
I can't hide it
Now hear my confession

I have been wrong about you
I thought I was strong without you
For so long
Nothing could move me
For so long
Nothing could change me

Now I feel myself surrender
Each time I see your face
I am captured by your beauty
Your unassuming grace
And I feel my heart is turning
Falling into place
I can't hide it
Now hear my confession

You are the air that I breathe
You're the ground beneath my feet
When did I stop believing?

Review Helpfulness: 2.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Updated Feb 22, 2004
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Cold? We just took a dip to cool off! - Antarctica

Cold? We just took a dip to cool off!

The General Consensus is...

Favorite thing: Cold!

Well, not really.
It was manageable, if you have enough clothing, that is.

Everything is in relativity.
I felt much colder when I was in Guangdong, China. It was raining then & very humid. Though it's just freezing point, it felt much much colder than Antarctica.

So, my verdict is Antarctica is NOT cold.
At least not when I was there.
(At times, I did't even wear that red parka!)
It can be chilly if it's windy & one is not dressed for it.
But after having been to the Arctic (which incidentally is in Winter while Antarctica is in its Summer season), Antarctica is comfortable :-)

Review Helpfulness: 3.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Updated Feb 14, 2004
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Human against the elements - Antarctica

Human against the elements

The Very famous

Favorite thing: Not really my favorite thing to listen to lectures while on a vacation... but this is an expedition, so be it.

A few names came up often.
One such is Sir Ernest Shackleton.
Here's a write-up on him on the Ocean Explorer.

"Sir Ernest Shackleton (1874-1922) Ernest Shackleton first visited the Antarctic as an officer on Robert Falcon Scott's 1901-04 National Antarctic Expedition, on which he joined Scott & Edward Wilson in sledging to a 'farthest south'.
In 1907-09, Shackleton led his own expedition, on which he discovered the Beardmore Glacier, reached the Polar Plateau, & came to within 97 miles of the South Pole before having to turn back.
The goal of Shackleton's next expedition, 1914-17, was to cross the Antarctic continent.
However, his ship Endurance was caught in the ice & sank, leaving the crew stranded.
After months of camping as the floes drifted north, Shackleton led his men 100 milse in 3 small boats to Elephant Island.
Shackleton then took one of the boats & sailed with 5 companions another 800 miles through some of the stormiest seas in the world to South Georgia, where he trekked across that island's mountaineous spine to a whaling station to raise the alarm about his comrades' plight.
Remarkably, not a man on that part of the expedition lost his life.
Shackleton died 5 years later on his beloved South Georgia, where he is buried."

Review Helpfulness: 3.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Written Feb 11, 2004
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Infinity - Antarctica

Infinity

Those who came before...

Favorite thing: THE EXPLORERS

"Who first discovered the Antarctic Continent?
His identity is uncertain, but the event probably happened during 1820.
Was it the Estonian, Thaddeus von Bellingshausen, in charge of a Russian expedition?
Or the British naval lieutenant Edward Bransfield?
Or the young American sealing captain Nathaniel Palmer, from Stonington, Connecticut?
Or was it none of these, but perhaps another sealer, who chose to keep his discovery secret for commercial reasons?

The first person to set foot on the Antarctica continent was probably the American sealer John Davis, who sailed from New Haven, Connecticut, & landed at what is thought to be Hughes Bay on the Antarctica Peninsula on 7 Feb. 1821.
He noted in his log that "I think this Southern Land to be a Continent."
The first woman to land on Antarctica was Caroline Mikkelsen, the wife of Captain Klarius Mikkelsen of the Norwegian whaling ship Thorshavn, who did so in 1934 on the Tryne Islands, in the Vestfold Hills of East Antarctica, at around 80 deg East.

Long-distance private expeditions seem almost commonplace nowadays, but one fo the earliest & most remarkable was the Trans-Antarctic Expedition organised by the American Will Steger.
His five companions were from France, Russia, China, Japan & Great Britain.
Using dogs to haul their sledges, they set off on 27 July 1989 from the northern end of the Antarctic Peninsula & reached their destination at the Russian Mirny base on 3 March 1990, some 4,000 miles (6,400 km) in 221 days."

~ Ocean Explorer ~

Review Helpfulness: 3.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Written Feb 11, 2004
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Pleneau - Antarctica

Pleneau

Frozen in Time

Favorite thing: BY WILLIAM ARNOLD
(Published on Seattle Post-Intelligence) on Jan. 29, 2004

Excerpt:
Crossing 60 deg south (the latitude that officially designates Antarctica), the first of what will become an endless parade of dazzlingly sculpted, blue-tinged icebergs begin to pass, & you're suddenly engulfed by a nature that is more pure, powerful & savagely inhospitable than anything you might have imagined.

As the days start to get longer (until you're finally in 24 hours of daylight) & the jagged, snow-covered peaks of the South Shetlands, then the continent itself appear, a mental metamorphosis takes hold.
The world of the cell phones, terrorists & "Jackass the Movie" seems a blissful galaxy away.

It is, of course, trite to report that the one thing the movies - even the Imax versions - fail to do is to capture Antarctica's epic beauty.
But I have to say it: There's simply no way the full scope & unique esthetic of all that solitude, scenery & pristine infinity can be contained on a movie screen.

And you don't easily become blase to it, at least not in a few days or weeks.
The adrenaline rush of an Antarctic cruise - the staggering vistas of the ice-clogged channels, the climbs through penguin rookeries, the Zodiac rides in the gathering twilight of 2 a.m. - keeps you in a perpetual state of mouth-dropping awe.

Review Helpfulness: 3.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Written Feb 11, 2004
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Frozen in Time - Antarctica

Frozen in Time

Frozen in Time

Favorite thing: BY WILLIAM ARNOLD
(Published on Seattle Post-Intelligence) on Jan. 29, 2004

Excerpt:
The first pleasant thing you learn about Antarctic travel is that it remains a relative rarity.
It tends to be expensive (for a couple, the cost of a new car), lengthy (because the distances are so great) & confined to a narrow, 3-month window of opportunity provided by the Antarctic summer.

This season, some 24 ships will make the voyage (tripling 2003's figure of 5000 tourists), but that's still a tiny scratch on a chunk of real estate larger than Europe.
It's been estimated that only 150,000 human beings have set foot here in all of history - a tourist statistic that Paris can equal in a single day.

It is also a fairly rugged trip.
I had a berth on the maiden voyage of MV Discovery - as luxurious as these things get - but it still involved "wet" landings with Zodiac inflatable boats, much exposure to numbing cold & lashing winds, & a 24-hour roller coaster ride across the Drake Passage - the world's roughest body of water.

All of these ships are geared to be an educational experience.
Mine had an impressive Antarctic library, & a dozen veteran Antarctic scientists lecturing daily on geography, glaciology, oceanography, history & wild life.
So you have this hearty illusion you're on an expedition, not a Princess cruise.

More than any other journey I've taken, the voyage to Antarctica - along the Patagonian coast of Argentina, over to the Falkland Islands & then the white-knuckle drop of the Drake Passage - seems a complete physical & psychological break with the rest of humanity.
You truly feel yourself falling off the bottom of the world.

(Cont. on next tip)

Review Helpfulness: 3.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Updated Feb 11, 2004
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Fairytale world - Antarctica

Fairytale world

Pleneau

Favorite thing: Remember this name & place.
It's probably one of the largest iceberg fields on this planet.
Well, it's most beautiful certainly.
I've more than 50 photos on this location alone.
I was out there twice remember?

Unfortunately, there is just not enough space in the travelogue section for me to upload my photos. So, here it will be.
For those of you who are not inspired by icebergs, you may skip this section from now onwards.
What follows will be more or less a slide show of the intricacy & beauty of Planeau.

Review Helpfulness: 3.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Written Feb 9, 2004
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Meeeeeeeeelt ... - Antarctica

Meeeeeeeeelt ...

The Heat is Up!

Fondest memory: I love icebergs.
What can I say? They stimulate my imagination... sooooo cold & yet (mind my language) bloody beautiful! It's almost aphrodisiac! Oops, what kind of description is that? I am sure I learned that word on VT! We need censorship! ;-)

Ok, I did some "serious" reading while onboard... bored while I was on Drake Passage. It was said by some expert, not me, that the temperature has been increasing by 2.5 deg. C every year for the last 20 years. The consequences? Figure that out & you'll be the Nobel Prize Winner of 2005! ;-)

Review Helpfulness: 3.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Updated Feb 9, 2004
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A great achievement for us all! - Antarctica

A great achievement for us all!

Antarctica the Continent

Fondest memory: Antarctica is a mystery.
Most have not seen an image of it or has heard anything distinctive other than it being very cold.
It's by far the least well known of the world's land masses since its discovery & exploration have been very recent.

Antarctica made up 10% of this planet's land surface! (Huge eh?!). It was sighted as recently as 1820 (though not confirmed) & 1899 has its first residence (men, I mean).
B4 1925, only 5% of Antarctica has been explored.

How many have visited?
Well under 200,000.
& now, we formed part of this rarity. :-)

Review Helpfulness: 3.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Updated Feb 9, 2004
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Wish i could just touch it! - Antarctica

Wish i could just touch it!

Purity

Fondest memory: Pure & Pristine... that's Antarctica.

One's love for it is beyond nationalities & beyond characters. It's within each & everyone of us, I think.

What can I say? I just am very romantic where icebergs are concerned.
Not penguins, not seals, not whales...
but icebergs.

Come to think of it, they are just water in another form.
Now, as philosophical as I'm ;-), tell me, love ... is there another form?

Review Helpfulness: 3.5 out of 5 stars

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  • Written Feb 8, 2004
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